Elisha Cook Jr., Happy Birthday! Born December 26th; 1903-1995

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elishacook

Elisha Cook Jr.

 

elishathe-great-gatsby-luxury-lifestyle-photography-leonardo-dicaprio

Leo DiCaprio from The Great Gatsby

An initial observation: it is remarkable how much DiCaprio looks like Elisha Cook Jr.! But those smooth good looks for Cook Jr. would soon fade into the wrinkled, gnarled features which we now associate with his particularly suited voice for evil and mania.

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Today, I am afforded the opportunity to write about one of the finest of the quirky supporting actors to ever grace the silver-screens of Hollywoodland, Elisha Cook Jr. In 1941 Cook gave us his portrayal of Wilmer Cook, the gunsel with the squirmy facial expressions, in the Maltese Falcon. This role by itself was enough to brand Elisha Cook Jr. forever in the memory of film, but he continued compiling to his list, unique, possessed, obsessive characters as in the following movies: Ball of Fire, 1941, The Big Sleep, 1946, The Great Gatsby, 1949 and Don’t Bother to Knock, 1952. Some have went as far as to say that Cook is the king of character actors, I will say that Cook Jr. is in the “Sweet Sixteen” of character actors.

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Humphrey Bogart, Happy Birthday! Born Christmas Day; 1899-1957

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Born Christmas Day of 1899, Humphrey DeForest Bogart made 8 appearances on Broadway before his first role in film came in 1928 in short film called “The Dancing Town”; it would be two years more before Bogart would make his first feature film.  His was a stalwart career, full of envious roles, with many Oscar worthy performances. His one Academy Award for Best Actor, of course, was in the African Queen, 1951, a brilliant interpretation as the drunkard, Charlie Allnut. But, he was just as dynamic as café owner Rick Blaine, in Casablanca, 1942 or one could choose, his turn as Lt. Cmdr. Philip Francis Queeg, in The Caine Mutiny, 1954. These few films I have mentioned but scratch the surface of his weighty, admirable resume, and what should have been an award-strewn path to film glory.

Bogart’s lack of multiple Oscars does not detract from his appearance in so many of what we the modern film-watchers consider to be true classics: The Maltese Falcon, 1941, To Have and Have Not, 1944, The Big Sleep, 1946, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Key Largo, 1948 and Sabrina, 1954. Other movies which Humphrey Bogart made might not come to mind immediately as a classic, but on further review we see that in their own way they rank at least as a minor classic as well; I am thinking of The Harder They Fall, 1956 (Bogart’s last film), The Barefoot Contessa, 1954 and High Sierra 1941. I could go on listing his plaudit laudable works but shall end by saying that since I was a boy I have been fascinated by Bogart, his tough-guy persona, he being my first anti-hero-hero and found so much more in his acting arsenal as I watched amazed at what this little guy with a slight lisp and too much saliva could do with a choice part.

Whether the lead or in support Humphrey Bogart seemed always to grab the camera’s attention, thereby our attention, and make the movie his own. What a great Christmas present we the movie-loving public received on Christmas Day, 1899. I don’t know about you but any and all of my differing Best-Film-Lists contain Bogart films galore, which if we take the second syllable of galore we find that the work of Bogart has taken on Hollywood lore status. Relax, if you can while taking in a Bogie movie of your choice.

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By C. S. Williams

Teresa Wright, Happy Birthday! Wright Place, Wright Time, Wright Beginning; The Early-Wright Highlights…

Teresa Wright LIFE , July 20, 1942

Teresa Wright LIFE Magazine, July 20, 1942

This brief biography is only a highlight of Ms. Wright’s fabulous career, I will not go in depth regarding those points that are best known, but instead will attempt to bring attention to those lesser recognized facts of her glorious stage, television and film résumé.

Teresa Wright, born October 27, 1918, really began to grow up into her own, in New Jersey when attending Columbia High School in Maplewood; she came under the influence of a wonderful teacher who was the head of the local dramatic society.[1] The teacher used a connection and got Wright a job as an apprentice at the Wharf Theater in Provincetown, Massachusetts.[2]

Wright was a member of the resident Barnstormers Company of Tamworth, New Hampshire, in July of 1939;[3] and by October had landed the role that would eventually make a name for her. Life With Father was in dress rehearsals, prior to its Baltimore run which was scheduled for a week beginning Monday, October 27.[4] Wright, then made her way to Broadway playing the same part of Mary in, Life With Father, and she was considered “well chosen” for the role and was “an attractive ingénue”.[5] This 1939 production of, Life With Father, was staged at the Empire Theatre, opening on November 8 and was a mega hit.[6]

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Mar_20__1941_

 

If trying to research Ms. Wright’s Great White Way debut appearance in, Our Town, in February of 1938, you won’t find a mention of her in the trade papers, because she was the understudy for the role of, Emily Webb, which part was portrayed by Martha Scott, who also was in her first appearance on Broadway.[7] In 1938 Wright did the portrayal of Emily Webb for, Our Town, for the road tour.[8]

While on Broadway in, Life With Father, Samuel Goldwyn saw the play and asked producer Oscar Serlin (if he thought Wright could play Alexandra in, The Little Foxes; Serlin said he was certain she could. Wright got the job for the film version of, The Little Foxes, without a try-out and with no rehearsals.[9] In the spring of 1941 she was granted eight-weeks leave of absence from, Life With Father, for the filming of the Goldwyn production of, The Little Foxes.[10] After the glowing reviews started flowing for Wright, Goldwyn decided to cast her in, Pride of the Yankees, as Mrs. Lou Gehrig. There were plans by Oscar Serlin to have Wright star on Broadway in King’s Maid by Ferenc Molnar,[11] but that did not see New York staging. The play opened in Gloucester, Massachusetts, in August of 1941, Wright co-starred with Sam Jaffe,[12] but the production did not perform well at the box-office. The King’s Maid, premiered on August 25 and ended the season at the Bass Rocks Theatre in Gloucester.[13]  Serlin hired Robert Edmond Jones to design the setting and the costumes for King’s Maid, and scheduled a week’s engagement in Baltimore at the Maryland Theater,[14] beginning on Monday, November 24, 1941. But, this cast did not include Teresa Wright.[15] The play was to have its Broadway premier on Thursday, December 4, 1941, at the Longacre Theater.[16] But that engagement for New York was canceled before the Baltimore showings were finished; one report said that the play would “not reach Broadway until structural changes have been made.”[17]

In January of 1943, Wright was slated to appear in, The North Star, written by Lillian Hellman,[18] but in March, before the cameras rolled, she was prescribed five-months of rest by her doctor, due to pregnancy[19]; Anne Baxter was signed as her replacement.[20] Ms. Wright, never a large young woman, weighed in at one-hundred-five-pounds at twenty-one years old,[21] dropped to ninety-eight by the first of September, 1943[22] and solicited concern from the Hollywood community, when by December she had dropped to eighty-nine-pounds.[23] This was due, I am sure, to the fact that she had miscarried sometime in the summer.

In addition to, North Star, two other projects were scheduled for Ms. Wright, and both were shelved. Bid For Happiness, which was only supposed to be delayed until, Those Endearing Young Charms, was completed, never found traction and Charms ended up not being produced by Goldwyn.[24] Teresa Wright was also a front-runner for the lead in, The Enchanted Cottage;[25] oh, what brilliant casting that would have been. But it was not to be.

 

By C. S. Williams

 

[1] Performing O’Neill: Conversations with actors and Directors, edited by Yvonne Shafer, St. Martin’s Press, 2000,

pages 195-212

[2] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) April 6, 1941

[3] Variety, July 5, 1939

Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) April 6, 1941

[4] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) October 25, 1939

[5] Variety, November 15, 1939

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) November 26, 1939

[6] Variety, November 15, 1939

[7] Internet Broadway Data Base

[8] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) April 6, 1941

[9] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) April 6, 1941

[10] Times Herald (Olean, New York) March 29, 1941

[11] Fresno Bee (Fresno, California) August 18, 1941

[12] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) August 30, 1941

[13] Lethbrideg Herald (Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada) August 22, 1941

Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) August 30, 1941

[14] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) November 28, 1941

[15] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) October 29, 1941

[16] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) November 19, 1941

[17] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) November 27, 1941

[18] Film Daily, January 6, 1943

The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Washington) February 8, 1943

[19] Screenland, September, 1943

[20] Motion Picture Daily, March 1, 1943

Showmen’s Trade Review, March 6, 1943

[21] Republic Kansas Advertiser (Republic, Kansas) August 8, 1940

[22] Harrisburg Telegraph (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) September 2, 1943

[23] Photoplay, December, 1943

[24] Film Daily, August 25, 1943

[25] Modesto News-Herald (Modesto, California) August 28, 1943

Teresa Wright, Happy Birthday! Wright Place, Wright Time, Wright Beginning; The Early-Wright Highlights…

Teresa Wright LIFE , July 20, 1942

Teresa Wright LIFE Magazine, July 20, 1942

This brief biography is only a highlight of Ms. Wright’s fabulous career, I will not go in depth regarding those points that are best known, but instead will attempt to bring attention to those lesser recognized facts of her glorious stage, television and film résumé.

Teresa Wright, born October 27, 1918, really began to grow up into her own, in New Jersey when attending Columbia High School in Maplewood; she came under the influence of a wonderful teacher who was the head of the local dramatic society.[1] The teacher used a connection and got Wright a job as an apprentice at the Wharf Theater in Provincetown, Massachusetts.[2]

Wright was a member of the resident Barnstormers Company of Tamworth, New Hampshire, in July of 1939;[3] and by October had landed the role that would eventually make a name for her. Life With Father was in dress rehearsals, prior to its Baltimore run which was scheduled for a week beginning Monday, October 27.[4] Wright, then made her way to Broadway playing the same part of Mary in, Life With Father, and she was considered “well chosen” for the role and was “an attractive ingénue”.[5] This 1939 production of, Life With Father, was staged at the Empire Theatre, opening on November 8 and was a mega hit.[6]

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Mar_20__1941_

 

If trying to research Ms. Wright’s Great White Way debut appearance in, Our Town, in February of 1938, you won’t find a mention of her in the trade papers, because she was the understudy for the role of, Emily Webb, which part was portrayed by Martha Scott, who also was in her first appearance on Broadway.[7] In 1938 Wright did the portrayal of Emily Webb for, Our Town, for the road tour.[8]

While on Broadway in, Life With Father, Samuel Goldwyn saw the play and asked producer Oscar Serlin (if he thought Wright could play Alexandra in, The Little Foxes; Serlin said he was certain she could. Wright got the job for the film version of, The Little Foxes, without a try-out and with no rehearsals.[9] In the spring of 1941 she was granted eight-weeks leave of absence from, Life With Father, for the filming of the Goldwyn production of, The Little Foxes.[10] After the glowing reviews started flowing for Wright, Goldwyn decided to cast her in, Pride of the Yankees, as Mrs. Lou Gehrig. There were plans by Oscar Serlin to have Wright star on Broadway in King’s Maid by Ferenc Molnar,[11] but that did not see New York staging. The play opened in Gloucester, Massachusetts, in August of 1941, Wright co-starred with Sam Jaffe,[12] but the production did not perform well at the box-office. The King’s Maid, premiered on August 25 and ended the season at the Bass Rocks Theatre in Gloucester.[13]  Serlin hired Robert Edmond Jones to design the setting and the costumes for King’s Maid, and scheduled a week’s engagement in Baltimore at the Maryland Theater,[14] beginning on Monday, November 24, 1941. But, this cast did not include Teresa Wright.[15] The play was to have its Broadway premier on Thursday, December 4, 1941, at the Longacre Theater.[16] But that engagement for New York was canceled before the Baltimore showings were finished; one report said that the play would “not reach Broadway until structural changes have been made.”[17]

In January of 1943, Wright was slated to appear in, The North Star, written by Lillian Hellman,[18] but in March, before the cameras rolled, she was prescribed five-months of rest by her doctor, due to pregnancy[19]; Anne Baxter was signed as her replacement.[20] Ms. Wright, never a large young woman, weighed in at one-hundred-five-pounds at twenty-one years old,[21] dropped to ninety-eight by the first of September, 1943[22] and solicited concern from the Hollywood community, when by December she had dropped to eighty-nine-pounds.[23] This was due, I am sure, to the fact that she had miscarried sometime in the summer.

In addition to, North Star, two other projects were scheduled for Ms. Wright, and both were shelved. Bid For Happiness, which was only supposed to be delayed until, Those Endearing Young Charms, was completed, never found traction and Charms ended up not being produced by Goldwyn.[24] Teresa Wright was also a front-runner for the lead in, The Enchanted Cottage;[25] oh, what brilliant casting that would have been. But it was not to be.

Teresa Wright died in March of 2005, her last film appearance was in Francis Ford Coppola’s, The Rainmaker, which was released in November of 1997; most of her latter acting credits were in TV movies and guest appearances on TV series of the 70’s, 80’s and 1990’s.

 

By C. S. Williams

 

[1] Performing O’Neill: Conversations with actors and Directors, edited by Yvonne Shafer, St. Martin’s Press, 2000,

pages 195-212

[2] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) April 6, 1941

[3] Variety, July 5, 1939

Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) April 6, 1941

[4] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) October 25, 1939

[5] Variety, November 15, 1939

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) November 26, 1939

[6] Variety, November 15, 1939

[7] Internet Broadway Data Base

[8] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) April 6, 1941

[9] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) April 6, 1941

[10] Times Herald (Olean, New York) March 29, 1941

[11] Fresno Bee (Fresno, California) August 18, 1941

[12] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) August 30, 1941

[13] Lethbrideg Herald (Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada) August 22, 1941

Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) August 30, 1941

[14] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) November 28, 1941

[15] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) October 29, 1941

[16] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) November 19, 1941

[17] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) November 27, 1941

[18] Film Daily, January 6, 1943

The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Washington) February 8, 1943

[19] Screenland, September, 1943

[20] Motion Picture Daily, March 1, 1943

Showmen’s Trade Review, March 6, 1943

[21] Republic Kansas Advertiser (Republic, Kansas) August 8, 1940

[22] Harrisburg Telegraph (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) September 2, 1943

[23] Photoplay, December, 1943

[24] Film Daily, August 25, 1943

[25] Modesto News-Herald (Modesto, California) August 28, 1943

Virginia Gregg, Happy Birthday! a Voice Uncommon

Virginia-Gregg-220x220 virginiagregg2

Virginia Lea Gregg was born March 6, 1916 to Edward Gregg and Dewey Todd, in Harrisburg, Illinois. Her family moved to California when Ms. Gregg was but eleven; first to Long Beach in 1927 and then to Pasadena in 1929. At Pasadena City College she majored in dramatics. Beginning in 1934 (she was eighteen) she debuted with the Pasadena Playhouse;[1] she would occasionally act with those resident players, garnering one lead role in her time there. Gregg attended Pasadena City College, where she majored in Dramatics; she won a scholarship at Pacific Academy of Dramatic Art, studying there for a year and a half. .[2]

Virginia’s passion was music, especially the bass viol; she played that instrument professionally for the CBS staff orchestra in Hollywood. Her love for the musical side of entertainment was sincerely inaugurated on August 24, 1936, when the Singing Strings was organized,[3] an all woman group (Virginia on bass) which hit their stride with the Hollywood Symphony of Loveliness in 1938; Gregg was twenty-two years old.[4]

The_San_Bernardino_County_ San Bernardino, California, Sun_Wed__Mar_16__1938_

San Bernardino County Sun, San Bernardino, California, March 16, 1938

 

Circa, 1938,[5] Gregg, had her intro into radio performance by illness, not hers but the leading lady of a drama on CBS. Gregg was practicing the music bridges for the program when she heard the news of the sick actress and offered her services to the director. She was given the script and the rest, as they say, “is history;”that was her first radio role, the first of many.[6] Her voice was heard “on the air” in, Dragnet, Gunsmoke, Jack Benny, Have Gun, Will Travel, Let George Do It, Dr. Kildare, Richard Diamond, Suspense, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar, Philip Marlowe, and The Whistler and near countless variety-program appearances.[7]

Radio Mirror  June 1945

 

Virginia Lea Gregg and her unforgettable face, her undeniable voice (a very fine vocal talent), a stiff-backed manner, made turns in many popular Hollywood movies; she was 30 when making her first appearance in film (Notorious, 1946, uncredited).

Gregg utilized that “special voice” 25 times in her television and film career, most notably as the voices of Tokyo Rose in Torpedo Run, 1958 and that of Norma Bates in Psycho, 1960, for which she went uncredited. Gregg was never a leading actress but she was genuinely a supporting player; her portrayal of Maj. Edna Heywood RN, in Operation Petticoat is probably her most memorable role; also, she did good work in Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing, 1955, as Anne Richards. Virginia Gregg died on September 15, 1986, leaving a veritable void in vocalization.

 

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By C. S. Williams


[1] Daily Register (Harrisburg, Illinois) August 20, 1947

[2] Radio Mirror, June, 1945

[3] News-Review (Roseburg, Oregon) August 23, 1938

[4] San Bernardino County Sun (San Bernardino, California) March 16; 19,  1938

[5] Daily Register (Harrisburg, Illinois) August 20, 1947

[6] Radio Mirror, June, 1945

[7] Old Time Radio Catalog

Ida Lupino, a Hollywood Bio in Brief, The Personal File

Ida Lupino Looking Through Movie Cameralupino_29

In order to cover the entirety of the career of Ida Lupino, while venturing into every position that she filled while working in Hollywood both in the movies and on television would consume a rather large book. Also, most of her career has been well written of, with very few stones left unturned. So it is with some consternation that I have resigned myself to concern this short biography only with Ms. Lupino’s early years (just a two-year sample) beginning with her arrival in America and a cursory look at her first three movies. With that said, roll back the curtain, bring the lights down low and let the show begin…

Ida Lupino was born on Monday, February 4, 1918 to comedic actor Stanley Richard Lupino and actress Constance “Connie” Gladys O’Shea, in London, England. She would die on August 3, 1995, but in between she lived a full and shall we say a bigger than life, life.

Lupino 1933-1935:

Ida Lupino was signed by Paramount Pictures in the summer of 1933 to a long-term contract; transportation from London for her and her mother was included with her $600.00 per week salary.[1] A Los Angeles court had to approve Ms. Lupino’s contract, prior to it being finalized;[2] with the green-light from the bench, Ida and her mother Constance Lupino departed from Southampton, England, on August 19, sailing on the S. S. Berengaria, and arrived in New York on August 25, 1933.

Lupino’s father, Stanley was of Italian descent and her mother Connie, Irish; her father’s mother was Jewish. Upon arrival in the States the comments began to fly that Ida was more American than English; Connie O’Shea Lupino’s explanation was that of the “the mingling of bloods,” Italian, English, Irish and Jewish, that distinguished Ida as more American than British; this in her appearance and conduct as well as was noted, “She even talks like an American.”[3] This natural acclimation benefited Ida Lupino, as she was quickly assimilated in this culture and accepted as an American actress. Within the first two years of her living in the States, Lupino exclaimed that, “I am first a southern Californian and second an English woman;” she was and still clearly is claimed as an American Cinema and Television treasure.

The_Sandusky_Register_ Sandusky, Ohio, Sun__Sep_17__1933_

Sandusky Register, Sandusky, Ohio, September 17, 1933

The rumor-mill was fully churning by August of 1933, speculating that Lupino had been brought to the states, to play Alice, in the upcoming Paramount production, Alice in Wonderland (this gossip began in England) which would be directed by Norman Z. McLeod.[4] Lupino’s next leg of her journey was by air and when she arrived in Los Angeles she was airsick, in fact quite ill; once recovered and her land-legs beneath her, she was chaperoned by Tinsel-Town legends, Al Kaufman and Adolph Zukor as they visited the late-spots in Hollywood.[5]

The_Bee_ Danville, Virginia Mon__Aug_28__1933_

The Bee, Danville, Virginia, August 28, 1933

The_Oelwein_Daily_Register_ Oelwein, Iowa, Tue__Aug_29__1933_

Oelwein Daily Register, Oelwein, Iowa, August 29, 1933

The_Escanaba_Daily_Press_ Escanaba, Michigan, Thu__Aug_31__1933_

Escanaba Daily Press, Escanaba, Michigan, August 31, 1933

Ida’s first Paramount film was (eighth overall, the first seven produced in England), Search for Beauty, which was released in February of 1934, followed by, Come On, Marines!, (March of 1934), and Ready for Love which was released in November of 1934. This last entry for 1934, Ready for Love, was well advertised and well received, her last two films of 1934 co-starred Richard Arlen.

search-for-beauty-1934Come on MarniesReady_for_Love_1934

Everything seemed on pace and maybe even was outpacing Ida Lupino’s expectations of her acting plans when the unthinkable occurred to the young actress. May of 1934 saw the Los Angeles area experience infections of infantile paralysis (polio) at epidemic proportions.[6] Ms. Lupino’s world could have changed permanently on June 22, of 1934, when she was stricken with polio. Yet, the diagnosis after prompt use of the serum was that hers was a mild case; the fact that the inoculation effectively blocked the danger of paralysis (this according to her doctor) must have brought great solace to her and her loved ones. [7]

Lupino was cleared to return to work by the middle of July, but after staying pool-side too long and receiving severe sunburn, her recuperation was further postponed. Still unable to do more than sit up in bed in the third week of July she rested yet the more;[8] her father had come to the States to be with her during her convalescence. The family planned a trip for Ida back home to England, scheduled for September 1, but Ms. Lupino was hit with the flu and was confined to bed by her personal physician (Dr. T. Percival Gerson[9]) for a week to ten days, delaying their trip for more than a month.[10] Mr. and Mrs. Lupino and Ida would finally leave for England in early October of 1934, arriving on the 19th. The visit with friends and family lasted nearly three months and on January 9 of 1935, Ida, her mother and her younger sister, Rita, sailed from England for the United States, with Ida’s health fully recovered and her purpose undeterred.

Shamokin_News_Dispatch_ Shamokin, Pennsylvania, Tue__Oct_9__1934_

Shamokin News Dispatch, Shamokin, Pennsylvania, October 9, 1934

Some general thoughts and perceptions of Ida Lupino:

Actress, writer, producer and director, the First Lady of Hollywood-Multiplicity and the Poster-Girl for Film Noir, both in front of the camera and behind; Lupino starred in some of the finest of the hard-edged films of the 1940’s. As with many actresses, she began with simple turns in sweet and neat movies, those mainly in 1930’s; she won no Academy Awards, nary a nomination from Mr. Oscar, but in 1943 she did receive Best Actress for The Hard Way from the New York Film Critics Circle Awards.[11] Ida Lupino or “Mother of Us All”, as she was know on the set when directing, was the second (Dorothy Arzner the first) woman accepted into the Directors Guild of America, a member from 1950 to 1995.[12]

Beautiful, a snappish speaker, pleading tones that brought the high and low vocal qualities together; and a crisp directing style, belonged to Lupino. She was direct and to the point, with a frugal hand upon the film’s helm; her producing and writing interests were stories that could have been torn from the headlines of newspapers and magazines. Whatever the thought regarding her acting and directing abilities, no one can doubt that Ida Lupino blazed the trail for women who aspired to more than just to act in film.

lupinoIdaaThumb211lupinoCKKTD00Zlupino500full-ida-lupinolupino4474-ida_lupinolupinoida01

Films in which Ms. Lupino had duties as Director, or Writer or Producer, including movies that she served in more than one capacity:

Director, Writer and Producer

Director, Writer and Producer

Director and Writer

lupinoHard,_Fast_and_Beautiful_Poster

Director

Director

Director and Writer

Director

Writer

Ida Lupino as an actress only:

lupinoparis-in-spring-movie-poster-1935-1020197046lupinoPoster - Anything Goes (1936)_06lupinoThe+Gay+Desperado+(1936)lupino6lupinothe-adventures-of-sherlock-holmes-movie-poster-1939-1020503585lupinoPoster - Light That Failed, The (1939)_04lupino1_20110515_123844lupinohigh-sierra-movie-poster-1941-1020416082lupinoPoster - Sea Wolf, The (1941)_06lupinoout_of_the_foglupino3086015709_0d3dd676b3lupinoThe_Hard_Way_1943_movie_posterlupinoIn_Our_Time_FilmPosterlupinopillow-to-post-movie-poster-1945-1010541394lupinoPoster - Escape Me Never (1947)_08 lupinobig_knife

By C. S. Williams

[1] Times Recorder (Zanesville, Ohio) July 30, 1933

Santa Cruz Sentinel (Santa Cruz, California) October 3, 1933

[2] Santa Cruz Sentinel (Santa Cruz, California) October 3, 1933

[3] Sandusky Register (Sandusky, Ohio) September 17, 1933

[4] Harrisburg Telegraph (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) August 26, 1933

[5] Times (San Mateo, California) September 18, 1933

[6] San Bernardino County Sun (San Bernardino, California) May 28, 1934

[7] Fresno Bee (Fresno, California) June 23, 1934

[8] San Bernardino County Sun (San Bernardino, California) July 1, 1934

Bristol Daily Courier (Bristol, Pennsylvania) July 13, 1934

Salt Lake Tribune (Salt Lake City, Utah) July 22, 1934

Reading Times (Reading, Pennsylvania) August 7, 1934

[9] One of those responsible in establishing the Hollywood Bowl and its summer music festival, HollywoodBowl.com

[10] San Bernardino County Sun (San Bernardino, California) September 2, 1934

Times (San Mateo, California) June 23, 1934

[11] 1943-New York Film Critics Circle Awards

[12] Directors Guild of America, Quarterly, Winter, 2006

Rudolph Maté, Close-Up and Personal

rudy-mate-portrait

Rudolph Maté

Maté Mystery: the Close-Up Shot… Rudolph Maté (Rezso Mayer) was born in Krakow, Poland, on January 21, 1898; a man self-described as of a ruddy complexion, one-hundred-sixty-pounds, five-feet-nine-inches in height, with brown hair and hazel eyes. Maté married Paula Sophie Hartkopko (born in Copenhagen, Denmark) in Paris on October 14, 1929 and the couple arrived in the United States in 1934. Their voyage was aboard the S. S. Europa, sailing from Cherbourg, France; the ship pulled into port in New York, on April 21, but they decided to continue on their trip and entered the States on foot from Mexicali, Mexico, to Calexico, California on June 26. In August of 1937 Paula Maté died and Rudolph would remain a widower for nearly four years. Maté next married a young lady (20 years his junior) named Regina Opoczynski, a fellow Pole, who had arrived in America in 1936. The ceremony was in Las Vegas on July 6, 1941; they would have a son, Christopher, born the day after Thanksgiving, on November 23, 1945. Their marriage ended in 1958 after Maté left his wife stranded in France for four weeks (this appears to have occurred in January of 1956); that point won her the divorce on March 31, 1958.[1]   Maté the Open Book: the Panoramic View… A storied career as cinematographer, a strong directorial resume and a vision for what appeals to the eye, faintly describes the work of Rudolph Maté. The Passion of Joan of Arc in 1928, started Maté’s rise in the film-world, almost meteoric in scope and with The Passion of Joan of Arc, Rudolph Maté was involved in shooting some of the finest close-up shots (if not the best example) in film history, this with director Carl Theodor Dreyer; his next unusual entry was the experimental, expressionistic Vampyr, 1932, again with master director Dreyer, offering some of the most eclectic use of moving- images ever put on celluloid. rudy220px-Passionarc giphypassion5PassionMaria-Falconetti-în-filmul-The-Passion-of-Joan-of-Arc passion-of-joan-of-arc-silent-film rudy1291965421-m peglegVampyr_1_L Vampyr_4_L Once in Hollywood we see his solid hand in Dodsworth and Come and Get It, both in 1936, Stella Dallas, 1937 and Love Affair, 1939. But it was to be in the 1940’s where Maté’s fame was polished (although no better quality than what had gone before, either in Europe or the States) with 5 consecutive Academy Award nominations for Best Cinematography; in 1940 Foreign Correspondent with director Alfred Hitchcock; That Hamilton Woman, 1941, directed by Alexander Korda; in 1942, The Pride of the Yankees; Sahara, directed by Zoltan Korda in 1943 and Cover Girl (Best Color Cinematography shared with Allen M. Davey). Rudolph Maté’s activities as a cinematographer ended with his uncredited work on The Lady from Shanghai, 1947, while in the same year beginning the directorial phase of his artistic journey with the fantasy-comedy-romance It Had to Be You (starring Ginger Rogers and Cornell Wilde). rudydodsworth rudyPoster - Come and Get It (1936)_02 rudytumblr_lq8hlo599g1qkge9po1_500rudyLove+Affair+poster+1939rudyforeign_correspondent_xlg rudyThat_Hamilton_woman_(1941)rudyThe_Pride_Of_The_Yankees_1942 rudySahara_-_1943_-_-poster rudy3shtPosterrudylady_from_shanghai_ver3rudy220px-It_Had_to_Be_You_FilmPoster D.O.A. from 1950, starts with what has to be accounted as one of the most dramatic and memorable movie-opening-lines with the conversation between lead character Frank Bigelow and the Captain of Homicide Detectives: Frank Bigelow: “I want to report a murder.” Homicide Captain: “Where was this murder committed?” Frank Bigelow: “San Francisco, last night.” Homicide Captain: “Who was murdered?” Frank Bigelow: “I was.” D.O.A. stands as a hallmark for Film-Noir and was just the fourth movie directed by Maté. Not to be roped into the Noir or Thriller genres Rudolph Maté made When Worlds Collide, a taunt record into the Sci-Fi -history-roll.  The Black Shield of Falworth, a historical, adventure-romance tale, 1954, The Violent Men (a westerner with Glen Ford, Barbara Stanwyck and Edward G. Robinson), 1955, Miracle in the Rain (a fanciful wartime romance starring Jane Wyman and Van Johnson), 1956 and the Greek historical-actioner, The 300 Spartans (with such notables as: Ralph Richardson, Richard Egan and Diane Baker), 1962; these films stand as testament to the directing skills of the photographic-maestro. Get your DVD, your Blu-Ray or Stream yourself and yours a Maté matinée  or star-filled evening performance of any of the works of director and cinematographer Rudolph Maté. rudyDOA1950rudyMPW-28234rudyPoster - Black Shield of Falworth, The_02rudythe-violent-men-movie-poster-1955-1020434901rudy22+Miracle+in+the+Rain,+1956.rudythree_hundred_spartans_xlg   By C. S. Williams   [1] Independent (Long beach, California) April 1, 1958